Blog

In the few weeks left until the election, here are five things we can all do

Education is finally back on the political agenda, and with the funding crisis taking centre stage, there has never been a more important time for ATL members to get their voices heard.

Funding and training are key to the ALN Bill working (Wales)

In December the Welsh Government revealed their planned new law which will change the way children with additional learning needs (ALN) are given support within the education system.

Kacper, what’s photosynthesis in Polish?

When it comes to supporting learners who are new to English, it is good practice to pair these learners with articulate peers who can act as good language role-models. And when these able peers are bilingual themselves, they are often ideally placed to engage with new arrivals. But how best to recognise the contribution of 'Kacper' in the classroom?

We need to broaden the debate around primary assessment

Yesterday, the government finally published its long-awaited consultation on primary assessment. There is a lot in there and I fully recommend everyone with an interest in the topic reads the document in its entirety and responds.

What's worse than being a teacher in this system? Being a child at the mercy of it

“Seeing those lightbulb moments, helping children to achieve.” This is what our members say teaching should be: but workload pressures and government’s heavy hand in curriculum, assessment and accountability means that the reality is often very different. 

T-levels and the Skills Plan: how the NEU will fight for the education of all young people

Last July, the government announced the Skills Plan, a radical overhaul of technical (previously known as vocational) education.

Workload is the burning issue for recruitment and retention

As most of you will be aware from your own experience, there is a growing crisis in teacher recruitment and retention.

School funding figures don’t add up. We need a new union to solve the problem

Here’s a simple maths problem. Answer it as completely as you can, showing your workings.

Why I'm voting YES: we need a strong and united voice

This is my 41st year working in primary education. I took early retirement from a headship eight years ago, but after unexpectedly losing my husband shortly after, I returned to the classroom as a specialist numeracy intervention teacher.

Why I'm voting YES: I love my union

I was one of the first trainees under the School Direct scheme in 2013. During my training, I was lost - we didn’t fit well into the world of initial teacher education, and no one seemed to care. We were guinea pigs. I had an awful start to my NQ year and was on the verge of leaving teaching.